Delhi HC orders BCI to carry out surprise visits to law schools – The New Indian Express


By PTI

NEW DELHI: Observing that the state of legal education, including its infrastructure, is “only worrying”, the Delhi High Court on Friday ordered the Bar Council of India (BCI) to set up special teams of experts to make surprise visits to law schools across the country.

Justice Chandra Dhari Singh said that BCI will post these inspection reports on its website within a month and will also take immediate action to close colleges that lack minimum infrastructure.

While deploring the “commercialization of education”, the judge added that these measures must be introduced to “cure the ills from which legal education suffers” and that it was surprising to see how the actors of legal education could tolerate such a situation.

The court order was issued following petitions from a private law college here on the issue of increasing the number of students enrolled in its 5-year BA LLB integrated course.

“The state of legal education, including the state of infrastructure, is nothing but worrying. There are law schools where you may not have enough professors, no classrooms, no library, etc.”, the court said.

“It is unfortunate that this Court is compelled to notice that there are law schools where you just have to go and pay the fees, the rest is taken care of. It is surprising how can a legal profession or how can we as legal education actors tolerate this kind of situation. It is a great responsibility for the Indian Bar Association to shut down such institutions,” he observed.

Stating that the BCI was the regulator of legal education, the court ordered: “it is ordered that the BCI constitute special teams of experts to carry out surprise visits to colleges which lack minimum infrastructure and adequate facilities. The inspection reports of the college teaching law on its website must be posted online within one month of such inspection.If during this inspection any colleges are found to be lacking in infrastructure, the BCI must take immediate action to close these colleges.

The tribunal affirmed that the relevant BCI rules themselves required that any institution providing legal education must comply with minimum standards of infrastructure and held that before increasing the strength of students, it was essential that the existing infrastructure be modernized in the colleges.

Therefore, in the present case, the court said that “classes or any educational activity cannot be permitted to operate in the basement” of the petitioning college.

The court emphasized that proper standards of education can only be achieved if there is adequate infrastructure on campus such as classrooms, libraries, laboratories, well-equipped teaching staff of the required caliber and a ratio appropriate student-teacher.

“Commercialization of education is another scourge plaguing the sector in India. One such manifestation of profiteering in this noble profession is enrolling additional students in every upcoming group without upgrading the existing infrastructure” , did he declare.

NEW DELHI: Observing that the state of legal education, including its infrastructure, is “only worrying”, the Delhi High Court on Friday ordered the Bar Council of India (BCI) to set up special teams of experts to make surprise visits to law schools across the country. Justice Chandra Dhari Singh said that BCI will post these inspection reports on its website within a month and will also take immediate action to close colleges that lack minimum infrastructure. While deploring the “commercialization of education”, the judge added that these measures must be introduced to “cure the ills from which legal education suffers” and that it was surprising to see how the actors of legal education could tolerate such a situation. The court order was issued following petitions from a private law college here on the issue of increasing the number of students enrolled in its 5-year BA LLB integrated course. “The state of legal education, including the state of infrastructure, is nothing but worrying. There are law schools where you may not have enough professors, no classrooms, no library, etc.”, the court said. “It is unfortunate that this Court is compelled to notice that there are law schools where you just have to go and pay the fees, the rest is taken care of. It is surprising how can a legal profession or how can we as legal education actors tolerate this kind of situation. It is a great responsibility on the Indian Bar Association to shut down such institutions,” he observed. Stating that the BCI was the regulator of legal education, the court ordered: “it is ordered that the BCI constitute special teams of experts to carry out surprise visits to colleges which lack minimum infrastructure and adequate facilities. The law college’s inspection reports on its website must be posted online within one month of this inspection. If, during this inspection, colleges are found to lack minimum infrastructure, the BCI must take immediate action to close these colleges. The tribunal affirmed that the relevant BCI rules themselves required that any institution providing legal education must comply with minimum standards of infrastructure and held that before increasing the strength of students, it was essential that the existing infrastructure be modernized in the colleges. Therefore, in the present case, the court said that “classes or any educational activity cannot be permitted to operate in the basement” of the petitioning college. The court emphasized that proper standards of education can only be achieved if there is adequate infrastructure on campus such as classrooms, libraries, laboratories, well-equipped teaching staff of the required caliber and a ratio appropriate student-teacher. “Commercialization of education is another scourge plaguing the sector in India. One such manifestation of profiteering in this noble profession is enrolling additional students in every upcoming group without upgrading the existing infrastructure” , did he declare.

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