Vince Gill, Marty Stuart and More Musician Hall of Fame Inductees


It’s hard to believe it’s been 16 years since the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum opened its doors in Nashville — and even harder to believe that until now two of the city’s most revered pickers weren’t part of it. of the club.

That belated honor finally arrived on Tuesday night, when Vince Gill and Marty Stuart (along with the rest of his band, The Fabulous Superlatives) were inducted into the Hall as part of its seventh class.

The two were in good company. Among their fellow inductees were ZZ Top frontman Billy Gibbons, “American Pie” songwriter Don McLean and country comic great Ray Stevens, as well as producer Jim Guercio and sound engineer George Massenburg.

Inductees pose for a photo prior to the 7th Annual Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum Concert and Induction Ceremony at the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tennessee on Tuesday, November 22, 2022.

The museum — a treasure trove of artifacts and instruments that have been played to rock, country, and R&B classics — is on the ground floor of the Nashville Municipal Auditorium. The inductees first gathered at the museum for a private medal ceremony with friends and family, then went upstairs for a concert of the stars in their honor.

It was the Hall’s first induction event in three years, and it also served as a tribute to its late founder and CEO, Joe Chambers, who died in September at the age of 68. His wife, Linda Chambers, is the organization’s new CEO, and said her husband “spent most of his time in the hospital planning this show.”

“He liked the players,” Guercio said. “He liked engineers. He liked the producers. There was no one in the process he didn’t respect.

Vince Gill performs during the 7th Annual Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum Concert and Induction Ceremony at the Municipal Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee on Tuesday, November 22, 2022.

After a speech and a musical tribute from Rodney Crowell (he sang “Liza Jane”), Vince Gill took the stage with an acoustic guitar.

“All these guys here,” he said, pointing to the house band filled with local musicians, “and the friendships I’ve made with this music have been amazing. I tried to think of a song that would capture the meaning and depth of that night. And I came up with this one, because it’s a true story. “

It was “This Old Guitar and Me,” a self-penned song about a past life with a 1942 Martin by your side.

Stuart and his bandmates were inducted by friend and former touring mate Steve Miller, who called them “an inspiration to anyone who hears them play”.

No matter when it happened, Stuart was destined for this club – not just as a master instrumentalist, but a listener with unparalleled respect for what inspired him.

He talked about a sound that “lit up everything about me” as a kid: Luther Perkins’ Fender Esquire guitar, as heard on Johnny Cash’s “At Folsom Prison.” That same guitar, he noted, was downstairs in the museum.

Marty Stuart and The Fabulous Superlatives perform during the 7th Annual Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum Concert and Induction Ceremony at the Municipal Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee on Tuesday, November 22, 2022.

“I just wanted to be in a band that played our own songs, but we were also pen pals and callbacks to our heroes.”

The band’s performance included “Country Boy Rock and Roll”, “Streamline” (featuring Miller on harmonica) and the musical star of the evening, the accapella “Heaven”, in tribute to Chambers.

Introduced by fellow acapella band (and recent collaborators) Home Free, McLean was ready to shoot his two biggest songs. There was “Vincent,” which echoed around the auditorium with serene pedal steel guitar, and the epic “American Pie,” complete with backing vocals from Home Free.

“I’m not folk, and I’m not rock, and I’m not country,” McLean said of his long history with Nashville. “I am just me.”

Don McLean points to his name before the 7th Annual Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum Concert and Induction Ceremony at the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tennessee on Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2022.

“It’s nice to find a home for what I do,” he later added.

“I’ll never live up to this,” Stevens joked after a full video package spanned his 60-plus-year career. But he was quickly proven wrong, showing off the extent of his hitmaking talent with a mini-set that began with the assertive ballad “Everything Is Beautiful” and ended with perhaps his signature novelty, “The Streaks”.

Ray Stevens performs during the 7th Annual Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum Concert and Induction Ceremony at the Municipal Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee on Tuesday, November 22, 2022.

Onstage, he called the night “almost perfect” – because Chambers wasn’t there.

Gibbons – who received the ‘Iconic Riff Award’ – was a late addition to the class and laughed as he told the crowd he was surprised to hear he was coming to Nashville to be inducted this week.

Clearly, the man doesn’t need much notice to set a stage on fire, regaling the house with ZZ Top’s “Tush” and finally “La Grange” (armed with one of the most emblematic of the moment).

“What an honor to be inducted with such a wonderful group of deserving individuals,” he said.

Billy Gibbons performs during the 7th Annual Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum Concert and Induction Ceremony at the Municipal Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee on Tuesday, November 22, 2022.
Previous Demystifying the grievance industry in our schools
Next Times Higher Education employability ranking: IIT Delhi, only Indian institution in the top 50